Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Murphy says mobile sensor data will allow adaptive interventions for maximizing healthy outcomes

Frey comments on why sunbelt metro area economies are still struggling

Krause says having religious friends leads to gratitude, which is associated with better health

Highlights

PSC Fall 2014 Newsletter now available

Martha Bailey and Nicolas Duquette win Cole Prize for article on War on Poverty

Michigan's graduate sociology program tied for 4th with Stanford in USN&WR rankings

Jeff Morenoff makes Reuters' Highly Cited Researchers list for 2014

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 20
No brown bag this week

Are antiseptic-coated central venous catheters effective in a real-world setting?

Publication Abstract

Borschel, D.M., C.E. Chenoweth, S.R. Kaufman, K.V. Hyde, K.A. VanDerElzen, Trivellore Raghunathan, C.D. Collins, and S. Saint. 2006. "Are antiseptic-coated central venous catheters effective in a real-world setting?" American Journal of Infection Control, 34(6): 388-393.

Background: Catheter-related bloodstream infections are common, costly, and morbid. Randomized controlled trials indicate that antiseptic-coated central venous catheters reduce infection rates.

Objective: To assess the clinical and economic effectiveness of antiseptic-coated catheters for critically ill patients in a real-world setting.

Methods: Central venous catheters coated with chlorhexidine/silver-sulfadiazene were introduced in all patients requiring central venous access in adult intensive care units at the University of Michigan Health System, a large, tertiary care teaching hospital. A pretest-post-test cohort design measured the primary outcome of catheter-related bloodstream infection rate, comparing the 2 years prior to the intervention with the 2 years following the intervention. We also evaluated cost-effectiveness and changes in vancomycin use.

Results: The intervention was associated with a 4% per month relative reduction in the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infection, after controlling for the effects of time. Overall, a 35% relative risk reduction (P < .0003) in the catheter-related bloodstream infection rate occurred in the posttest phase. The use of antiseptic-coated catheters reduced costs more than $100,000 annually. Vancomycin use was less in units in which antiseptic catheters were used compared with wards in which these catheters were not used.

Conclusion: Antiseptic-coated catheters appear to be clinically effective and economically efficient in a real-world setting.

DOI:10.1016/j.ajic.2005.08.004 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next