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Statistical analysis of choice experiments and surveys

Publication Abstract

McFadden, D.L., A.C. Bemmaor, F.G. Caro, J. Dominitz, B.H. Jun, A. Lewbel, R.L. Matzkin, F. Molinari, N. Schwartz, Robert Willis, and J.K. Winter. 2005. "Statistical analysis of choice experiments and surveys." Marketing Letters, 16(3-4): 183-196.

Measures of households' past behavior, their expectations with respect to future events and contingencies, and their intentions with respect to future behavior are frequently collected using household surveys. These questions are conceptually difficult. Answering them requires elaborate cognitive and social processes, and often respondents report only their "best" guesses and/or estimates, using more or less sophisticated heuristics. A large body of literature in psychology and survey research shows that as a result, responses to such questions may be severely biased. In this paper, (1) we describe some of the problems that are typically encountered, (2) provide some empirical illustrations of these biases, and (3) develop a framework for conceptualizing survey response behavior and for integrating structural models of response behavior into the statistical analysis of the underlying economic behavior.

DOI:10.1007/s11002-005-5884-2 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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