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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Barbara A. Anderson photo

Sex Differentials in Mortality in the Soviet Union

Publication Abstract

Anderson, Barbara A., and Brian D. Silver. 1986. "Sex Differentials in Mortality in the Soviet Union." Population Studies, 40(2): 191-214.

In this paper we take a different approach from other authors to the study of differences between the mortality of the two sexes in the USSR. First, we use measures of mortality that are not sensitive to the most common types of error in data and that reflect experience in an age range that is important from a policy perspective: the working ages. Secondly, we measure variation in mortality between regions of the USSR. Thirdly, we compare these regional mortality trends with experience in 33 developed countries. The sex differential in mortality in the USSR is an amalgam of very different regional patterns. Its size and rate of change are more extreme in the USSR than in other countries, and are mainly due to the poor and rapidly worsening mortality of men in the Russian Republic. But the widening sex differentials and increasing mortality of men in the older working ages in Soviet regions are similar to trends in many other developed countries.

DOI:10.1080/0032472031000142026 (Full Text)

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