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Educational Web-based intervention for high school students to increase knowledge and promote positive attitudes toward organ donation

Publication Abstract

Vinokur, Amiram D D., Robert M. Merion, Mick P. Couper, Eleanor G. Jones, and Yihui Dong. 2006. "Educational Web-based intervention for high school students to increase knowledge and promote positive attitudes toward organ donation." Health Education and Behavior, 33(6): 773-786.

A sample of 490 high school students from 81 schools in Michigan participated in an experiment in which they were randomly assigned to either a control or an experimental Web site. The experimental Web site provided exposure to educational material about the process of organ donation and organ transplantation. The control Web site provided educational material on methods to avoid the common cold. The pre- and posttests of knowledge of issues related to organ donation and of attitude toward donation demonstrated statistically significant increases for the experimental group compared with the control group. A structural equation path model suggested that these increases in knowledge and prodonation attitude mediated the effects of the experiment on contacting the Michigan donor registry. The increase in knowledge and in prodonation attitude increased the likelihood of contacting the registry. The potential for this and similar other Web interventions to enhance students' health education is discussed.

DOI:10.1177/1090198106288596 (Full Text)

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