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Surprising findings on what influences unintended pregnancy from Wise, Geronimus and Smock

Recommendations on how to reduce discrimination resulting from ban-the-box policies cite Starr's work

Brian Jacob on NAEP scores: "Michigan is the only state in the country where proficiency rates have actually declined over time."

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Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

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Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

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Mon, March 13, 2017, noon:
Rachel Best

The impact of resource loss and traumatic growth on probable PTSD and depression following terrorist attacks

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Hobfoll, Stevan E., Melissa Tracy, and Sandro Galea. 2006. "The impact of resource loss and traumatic growth on probable PTSD and depression following terrorist attacks." Journal of Traumatic Stress, 19(6): 867-878.

The authors interviewed by phone 2,752 randomly selected individuals in New York City within 6 to 9 months after the attacks of September 11, 2001 on the World Trade Center, and 1,939 of these were reinterviewed at a 12- to 16-month follow-up. It was hypothesized that resource loss would significantly predict probable posttraumatic Stress disorder (PTSD) and probable depression since September 11, and that resource loss impact would be independent of previously identified predictors relating to individuals' demographic characteristics, history of stressful event exposure, prior trauma history, peritraumatic experience, and social support. Second, it was predicted that reported traumatic growth would be related to greater not lesser, psychological distress. The authors findings supported their hypotheses for resource loss, but traumatic growth was unrelated to pychological outcomes when other predictors were controlled.

DOI:10.1002/jts.20166 (Full Text)

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