Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Thompson says America must "unchoose" policies that have led to mass incarceration

Axinn says new data on campus rape will "allow students to see for themselves the full extent of this problem"

Frey says white population is growing in Detroit and other large cities


Susan Murphy to speak at U-M kickoff for data science initiative, Oct 6, Rackham

Andrew Goodman-Bacon, former trainee, wins 2015 Nevins Prize for best dissertation in economic history

Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12 at noon, 6050 ISR
Joe Grengs: Policy & planning for transportation equity

Vicki Freedman photo

Neighborhoods and Disability in Later Life

Publication Abstract

Download PDF versionFreedman, Vicki, Irina B. Grafova, Robert F. Schoeni, and Jeannette Rogowski. 2007. "Neighborhoods and Disability in Later Life." PSC Research Report No. 07-622. May 2007.

This paper uses the Health and Retirement Study to explore linkages between neighborhood features and stages of the disablement process among adults ages 55 and older in the United States. We consider multiple dimensions of the neighborhood environment including environmental stressors; safety, mobility and access to services; and social and economic conditions. In doing so, we use factor analysis to reduce indicators into 8 neighborhood scales, which we incorporate into two-level logistic regression models. Findings suggest that economic advantage matters earlier in the disablement process and economic disadvantage is linked to later stages. There also appear to be important differences by gender, with street connectivity and economic disadvantage associated with outcomes only for men. Although most neighborhood effects are relatively small in absolute terms, neighborhood economic advantage effects appear sizeable.

PMCID: PMC2478756. (Pub Med Central)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next