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Frey's Scenario F simulation mentioned in account of the Democratic Party's tribulations

U-M Poverty Solutions funds nine projects

Dynarski says NY's Excelsior Scholarship Program could crowd out low-income and minority students

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Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Patient suffering and caregiver compassion: new opportunities for research, practice, and policy

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Schulz, Richard, Randy S. Herbert, Mary Amanda Dew, Stephanie L. Brown, Michael F. Scheier, Scott R. Beach, Sara J. Czaja, Lynn M. Martire, David Coon, Kenneth M. Langa, Laura N. Gitlin, Alan B. Stevens, and Linda Nichols. 2007. "Patient suffering and caregiver compassion: new opportunities for research, practice, and policy." Gerontologist, 47(1): 4-13.

The purpose of this article is to stimulate discussion and research about patient suffering and caregiver compassion. It is our view that these constructs are central to understanding phenomena such as family caregiving, and that recognizing their unique role in the caregiving experience provides new directions for intervention research, clinical practices, and social policy. We first define and characterize these constructs, review empirical evidence supporting the distinct role of suffering and compassion in the context of caregiving, and then present a conceptual model linking patient suffering with caregiver compassion. We conclude with a discussion of implications and future directions for clinical intervention, research, and policy.

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