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Effects of Job Displacement on Social Participation: Findings over the Life Course of a Cohort of Joiners

Publication Abstract

Download PDF versionBrand, Jennie, and Sarah Burgard. 2007. "Effects of Job Displacement on Social Participation: Findings over the Life Course of a Cohort of Joiners." PSC Research Report No. 07-623. May 2007.

Career disorder and economic distress have been identified as potential causes of the observed decline in social participation in the U.S. We examine the causal effect of job displacement, a career disorder-producing event that is associated with subsequent socioeconomic and psychological decline, on social participation. Using more than 45 years of panel data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study and difference-in-differences regression estimation, we find significant and lasting negative effects of displacement on subsequent social participation for workers displaced during their prime earnings years, ages 35-53, while no effect for workers displaced in the years approaching retirement, ages 53-64. Results also suggest that socioeconomic and psychological decline resulting from job displacement do not explain the negative impact of job displacement on social participation.

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