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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Intergenerational transmission of sex-specific differential treatments: The allocation of education resources among siblings

Publication Abstract

Chu, C. Y. Cyrus, Ruey Tsay, and R. Yu . 2008. "Intergenerational transmission of sex-specific differential treatments: The allocation of education resources among siblings." Social Science Research, 37(2): 386-399.

Using a unique data set of 3-generation education information, in this article we extend the analysis of Greenhalgh [Greenhalgh, Susan, 1985. Sexual Stratification: The other side of 'growth with equity' in East Asia. Population and Development Review 11, 265–314] and study the question of intergenerational transmission of sex-specific differential treatments. The rich data are obtained from Taiwan's Panel Study of Family Dynamics project. As far as the macro pattern is concerned, we found that although there is a clear tendency of differential treatment against females in the old generation, this tendency is significantly weakened and nearly vanishes in the young generation. Furthermore, the supporting effect of senior siblings in the old generation becomes a crowding (resource-dilution) effect in the young generation. However, within each micro lineage, there is a mild "habitus" effect in the sense that parents who experienced gender-specific differential treatment tend to treat their children in a similar fashion. We find that parents' education contributes to the elimination of sex-based differential treatment, consistent with the finding in Thornton et al. [Thornton, Arland, Alwin, Duane F. and Camburn, Donald, 1983. Causes and consequences of sex-role attitudes and attitude change. American Sociological Review 48, 211–227].

DOI:10.1016/j.ssresearch.2007.06.008 (Full Text)

Country of focus: Thailand.

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