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Lam looks at population and development in next 15 years in UN commission keynote address

Mitchell et al. find harsh family environments may magnify disadvantage via impact on 'genetic architecture'

Frey says Arizona's political paradoxes explained in part by demography

Highlights

PSC newsletter spring 2014 issue now available

Kusunoki wins faculty seed grant award from Institute for Research on Women and Gender

2014 PAA Annual Meeting, May 1-3, Boston

USN&WR ranks Michigan among best in nation for graduate education in sociology, public health, economics

Next Brown Bag

Monday, April 21
Grant Miller: Managerial Incentives in Public Service Delivery

The economics of behavioral health services in medical settings: A summary of the evidence

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Blount, A., R. Kathol, M. Thomas, Michael Schoenbaum, B.L. Rollman, W. O'Donohue, and C.J. Peek. 2007. "The economics of behavioral health services in medical settings: A summary of the evidence." Professional Psychology-Research and Practice, 38(3): 290-297.

The health care system in the United States, plagued by spiraling costs, unequal access, and uneven quality, can find its best chance of improving the health of the population through the improvement of behavioral health services. It is in this area that the largest potential payoff in reduction of morbidity and mortality and increased cost-effectiveness of care can be found. A review of the evidence shows that many forms of behavioral health services, particularly when delivered as part of primary medical care, can be central to such an improvement. The evidence supports many but not all behavioral health services when delivered in settings in which people will accept these services under particular administrative and fiscal structures.

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