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Adherence to a behavioral program to prevent incontinence

Publication Abstract

Hines, S.H., J.S. Seng, L. Messer, Trivellore Raghunathan, A.C. Diokno, and C.M. Sampselle. 2007. "Adherence to a behavioral program to prevent incontinence." Western Journal of Nursing Research, 29:36-56.

This exploratory study assesses factors predicting adherence to a behavioral intervention to prevent urinary incontinence. Community-dwelling, postmenopausal women (N = 164) were taught pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and bladder training (BT) and followed with surveys for I year. Content analysis of open-ended responses coded descriptions of approaches participants used to incorporate PFMT into daily life. Exploratory bivariate and logistic regression analyses determined predictors of approach used and adherence. Results indicate women incorporated PFMT into their lives using either a routine or ad hoc approach. Those using a routine approach at 3 months were 12 times more likely to adhere (odds ratio [OR] = 12.4, confidence interval [CI] = 4.0 - 38.8, p <.001) at a high level at 3 months and significantly more likely to maintain that level 12 months post-intervention (OR = 2.7, CI = 1.2 - 6.0, p <.014). Practicing BT was related to high adherence.

DOI:10.1177/0193945906293793 (Full Text)

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