Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Stafford says too early to say whether stock market declines will curtail Americans' spending

Eisenberg says many colleges now train campus personnel to spot and refer troubled college students

Farley on new strategies for city insolvencies in Michigan

Highlights

Call for papers: Conference on Integrating Genetics and the Social Sciences, Oct 21-22, 2016, CU-Boulder

PRB training program in policy communication for pre-docs. Application deadline, 2.28.2016

Call for proposals: PSID small grants for research on life course impacts on later life wellbeing

PSC News, fall 2015 now available

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Feb 1 at noon, 6050 ISR-Thompson
Sarah Miller

How long does it take to become a proficient hunter? Implications for the evolution of extended development and long life span

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Gurven, M., Hillard Kaplan, and M. Gutierrez. 2006. "How long does it take to become a proficient hunter? Implications for the evolution of extended development and long life span." Journal of Human Evolution, 51(5): 454-470.

Human hunting is arguably one of the most difficult activities common to foraging peoples now and in the past. Children and teenagers have usually been described as incompetent hunters in ethnographies of hunter-gatherers. This paper explores the extent to which adult-level competence is limited more by the constraints of physical capital, or body size, and brain-based capital, or skills and learning. The grandmother hypothesis requires that production is an increasing function of size alone, while the embodied capital model stipulates that production is a function of both size and delayed learning. Tests based on observational, interview, and experimental data collected among Tsimane Amerindians of the Bolivian Amazon suggest that size alone cannot explain the long delay until peak hunting productivity. Indirect encounters (e.g., smells, sounds, tracks, and scat) and shooting of stationary targets are two components of hunting ability limited primarily by physical size alone, but the more difficult components of hunting-direct encounters with important prey items and successful capture-require substantial skill. Those skills can take an additional ten to twenty years to develop after achieving adult body size.

DOI:10.1016/j.jhevol.2006.05.003 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next