Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Sastry's 10-year study of New Orleans Katrina evacuees shows demographic differences between returning and nonreturning

Stafford says less educated, smaller investors more likely to sell off stock and lock in losses during market downturn

Chen says job fit, job happiness can be achieved over time

Highlights

Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

David Lam is new director of Institute for Social Research

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12
Joe Grengs, Policy & Planning for Social Equity in Transportation

Cost-effectiveness and net benefit of enhanced treatment of depression for older adults with diabetes and depression

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Katon, W., J. Unutzer, M.Y. Fan, J.W. Williamn, Michael Schoenbaum, E. H B Lin, and E.M. Hunkeler. 2006. "Cost-effectiveness and net benefit of enhanced treatment of depression for older adults with diabetes and depression." Diabetes Care, 29(2): 265-270.

OBJECTIVE - To determine the incremental cost-effectiveness and net benefit of a depression collaborative care program compared with usual care for patients with diabetes and depression. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - This article describes a preplanned subgroup analysis of patients with diabetes from the Improving Mood-Promoting Access to Collaborative (IMPACT) randomized controlled trial. The setting for the study included 18 primary care clinics from eight health care organizations in five states. A total of 418 of 1,801 patients randomized to the IMPACT intervention (n = 204) versus usual care (n = 214) had coexisting diabetes. A depression care manager offered education, behavioral activation, and a choice of problem-solving treatment or support of antidepressant management by the primary care physician. The main outcomes were incremental cost-effectiveness and net benefit of the program compared with usual care. RESULTS - Relative to usual care, intervention patients experienced 115 (95% CI 72 - 159) more depression-free days over 24 months. Total outpatient costs were $25 (95% CI - 1,638 to 1,689) higher during this same period. The incremental cost per depression-free day was 25 cents (-$14 to $15) and the incremental cost per quality-aqjusted life year ranged from $198 . (144-316) to $397 (287 - 641). An incremental net benefit of $1,129 (692 - 1,572) was found. CONCLUSIONS - The IMPACT intervention is a high-value investment for older adults with diabetes; it is associated with high clinical benefits at no greater cost than usual care.

DOI:10.2337/diacare.29.02.06.dc05-1572 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next