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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Examining geographic and occupational mobility: A loglinear modelling approach

Publication Abstract

Lin, Ge, and Christiadi. 2006. "Examining geographic and occupational mobility: A loglinear modelling approach." Papers in Regional Science, 85(4): 505-522.

This article attempts to develop a set of loglinear models that synthesise gravity models of interregional mobility and loglinear models of occupational mobility. The development of the model is progressed from a simple two-way mobility table analysis to a three-way analysis that controls for one aspect of mobility while investigating another and eventually to a four-way analysis that simultaneously assesses the joint effect of occupational and geographic mobility. An example based on data from the 1970 United States census demonstrates that the models can effectively capture the joint effect of occupational and geographic mobility. The results show that interregional movers may not necessarily have strong occupational persistence. With regard to female dominated clerical occupations, interregional migration is positively associated with upward occupational mobility, and the propensity for upward mobility was consistently greater for males than for females.

DOI:10.1111/j.1435-5957.2006.00100.x (Full Text)

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