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2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

Russell Sage 2-week workshop on social science genomics, June 11-23, 2017, Santa Barbara

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Hooking up: The relationship contexts of "nonrelationship" sex

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Manning, Wendy, P.C. Giordano, and M.A. Longmore. 2006. "Hooking up: The relationship contexts of "nonrelationship" sex." Journal of Adolescent Research, 21(5): 459-483.

More than one half of sexually active teens have had sexual partners they are not dating. However, remarkably little is known about the nature of these sexual relationships. Using survey and qualitative data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study the authors contrast the qualities of dating sexual relationships and sexual relationships that occur outside the dating context. They find that adolescents having sex outside of the dating context are choosing partners who are friends or ex-girfriends and/or boyfriends. Moreover one third of these nondating sexual partnerships are associated with hopes or expectations that the relationship will lead to more conventional dating relationships. Boys and girls who experience sex outside of conventional dating relationships often share similar orientations toward their relationship. Results suggest that a more nuanced view is key to understanding adolescent sexual behavior.

DOI:10.1177/0743558406291692 (Full Text)

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