Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Bleakley says reversing US trade policies could be 'recipe for slowdown'

ISR's Scott Page cited on 'bee swarm' social influence in crowd response to Trump

Novak, Geronimus, and Martinez-Cardoso find fear of immigration can affect Latino birth outcomes

More News

Highlights

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Feb 13, 2017 at noon:
Daniel Almirall

Sex, Gender and Vulnerability

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Download PDF versionSnow, Rachel C. 2007. "Sex, Gender and Vulnerability." PSC Research Report No. 07-628. 9 2007.

This paper is concerned with how sex chromosomes and gendered experience differentially contribute to health outcomes, and how gender effects provide an under- explored avenue for health intervention. Research on gender and health is currently undermined by conflation of sex and gender in much of the epidemiologic and clinical literature. This precludes any meaningful reflection on the extent to which our genetic blueprint, versus gendered socialisation, contributes to the specific health vulnerabilities of males or females. Drawing on the 2002 global DALYs for males and females, this paper looks at health outcomes that differentially affect males and females, and distinguishes between vulnerabilities linked to the XX or XY genotype, vulnerabilities due to gendered life experience, and vulnerabilities about which we understand relatively little. The paper highlights the dynamic and changeable nature of gendered health vulnerabilities. Given that gender-based risks are in principal amenable to social change, they offer untapped potential for health interventions.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next