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Sastry's 10-year study of New Orleans Katrina evacuees shows demographic differences between returning and nonreturning

Stafford says less educated, smaller investors more likely to sell off stock and lock in losses during market downturn

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Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

David Lam is new director of Institute for Social Research

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12
Joe Grengs, Policy & Planning for Social Equity in Transportation

Paths to the city and roads to death. Mortality and migration in East Belgium during the industrial revolution

Publication Abstract

Oris, Michel, and George C. Alter. 2001. "Paths to the city and roads to death. Mortality and migration in East Belgium during the industrial revolution." In Recent Work in Belgian Historical Demography, Belgisch tijdschrift voor nieuwste geschiedenis - Revue belge d'histoire contemporaire, XXXI edited by I. Devos and M. Neven. 3/4: 453-495.

We offer an interpretation of the migration-mortality complex in the nineteenth century at the time that the population was escaping from the grip of hunger and recurrent famines. The geographical setting is the province of Liège in East Belgium, located in the French part of the Kingdom and bordering the Netherlands and Germany. This region was the first one on the European continent to follow the British example and enter the industrial revolution. We use results from several case studies, based on both aggregate statistics and cross-sectional analyses of nominal data. In addition, we present some original multivariate longitudinal analyses from Belgian population registers, which are famous for their precise recording of migratory movements.

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