Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Bleakley says reversing US trade policies could be 'recipe for slowdown'

ISR's Scott Page cited on 'bee swarm' social influence in crowd response to Trump

Novak, Geronimus, and Martinez-Cardoso find fear of immigration can affect Latino birth outcomes

More News

Highlights

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

ISR Next Generation Awards: Support for pre-docs and early-career researchers in the social sciences

Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Feb 13, 2017 at noon:
Daniel Almirall

When protoindustry collapsed fertility and the demographic regime in rural eastern Belgium during the industrial revolution

Publication Abstract

Oris, M., M. Neven, and George C. Alter. 2007. "When protoindustry collapsed fertility and the demographic regime in rural eastern Belgium during the industrial revolution." Historical Social Research-Historische Sozialforschung, 32(2): 137-159.

The story of the Demographic Transition is often told as a contrast between a dynamic urban-industrial sector and a static and traditional countryside. Rural areas are viewed as bastions of stability that resisted the transformative economic and cultural forces emanating from urban centers. This stereotype ignores the transformation occurring within the rural sector, in both its relationships with the urban-industrial world and its own internal economy. Looking at their demographic regime, especially the fertility pattern, we see that to a large extent, inhabitants of East Belgian countryside were able to cope with rural deindustrialization, population pressure and urban industrial development. It is not reasonable to see their late transition to low marital fertility as a lack of adaptive capacities, when they showed exactly the contrary throughout the century.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next