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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

What predicts psychological demographics, resilience after disaster? The role of resources, and life stress

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Bonanno, G.A., Sandro Galea, A. Bucciarelli, and D. Vlahov. 2007. "What predicts psychological demographics, resilience after disaster? The role of resources, and life stress." Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 75(5): 671-682.

A growing body of evidence suggests that most adults exposed to potentially traumatic events are resilient. However, research on the factors that may promote or deter adult resilience has been limited. This study examined patterns of association between resilience and various sociocontextual factors. The authors used data from a random-digit-dial phone survey (N = 2,752) conducted in the New York City area after the September H, 200 1, terrorist attack. Resilience was defined as having 1 or 0 posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and as being associated with low levels of depression and substance use. Multivariate analyses indicated that the prevalence of resilience was uniquely predicted by participant gender, age, race/ethnicity, education, level of trauma exposure, income change, social support, frequency of chronic disease, and recent and past life stressors. Implications for future research and intervention are discussed.

DOI:10.1037/0022-006X.75.5.671 (Full Text)

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