Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

H. Luke Shaefer and colleagues argue for a universal child allowance

Hindustan Times points out high value of H-1B visas for US innovation, welfare, and tech firm profits

Novak, Geronimus, Martinez-Cardoso: Threat of deportation harmful to immigrants' health

More News

Highlights

Heather Ann Thompson wins Pulitzer Prize for book on Attica uprising

Lam explores dimensions of the projected 4 billion increase in world population before 2100

ISR's Nick Prieur wins UMOR award for exceptional contribution to U-M's research mission

How effectively can these nations handle outside investments in health R&D?

More Highlights

Reynolds Farley photo

Blacks, Hispanics and White Ethnic Groups: Are Blacks Uniquely Disadvantaged?

Publication Abstract

Farley, Reynolds. 1990. "Blacks, Hispanics and White Ethnic Groups: Are Blacks Uniquely Disadvantaged?" American Economic Review, 80(2): 237-41.

In A Common Destiny, a study of the status of black Americans, the National Academy of Science stated that despite substantial progress, American blacks remained far behind whites on social and economic indicators. This paper attempts to determine whether this is an oversimplification by comparing the progress of blacks with that of Hispanics, other racial minorities and white ethnic groups using data from the 1980 Census. After examining the characteristics of 50 racial-ethnic groups, the author concludes that the Academy's statement would have been no different had they considered an array of racial and ethnic groups. He finds that in 1980 Vietnamese and Puerto Ricans were more impoverished than blacks and, in terms of per capita income, Mexicans and American Natives were similar to blacks. There was considerable variation in the status of the 37 white ethnic groups and Eastern European groups had exceptionally high incomes. However, all of the white ethnic groups were more prosperous than blacks. The only white group whose educational attainment or occupational status approximated that of blacks were people who identified themselves as white by race but American Indian by ancestry. When the analysis focused on earnings of native born men, blacks were the most disadvantaged with earnings below those of Native Americans, Mexicans, and Puerto Ricans. Blacks and men from these three groups had characteristics associated with low earnings. In addition, blacks, other racial minorities (including Asians), and Hispanic groups had rates of return that were lower than those of white ethnic groups.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next