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Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Modeling speech disfluency to predict conceptual misalignment in speech survey interfaces

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Ehlen, P., M.F. Schober, and Frederick G. Conrad. 2007. "Modeling speech disfluency to predict conceptual misalignment in speech survey interfaces." Discourse Processes, 44(3): 245-265.

Computer-based interviewing systems could use models of respondent disfluency behaviors to predict a need for clarification of terms in survey questions. This study compares simulated speech interfaces that use two such models-a generic model and a stereotyped model that distinguishes between the speech of younger and older speakers-to several non-modeling speech interfaces in a task where respondents provided answers to survey questions from fictional scenarios. The modeling procedure found that the best predictor of conceptual misalignment was a critical Goldilocks range for response latency-hat is, a response time that is neither too slow nor too fast-outside of which responses are more likely to be conceptually misaligned. Different Goldilocks ranges are effective for younger and older speakers.

DOI:10.1080/01638530701600839 (Full Text)

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