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Fomby finds living with step- or half-siblings linked to higher aggression among 5 year olds

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PRB training program in policy communication for pre-docs. Application deadline, 2.28.2016

Call for proposals: PSID small grants for research on life course impacts on later life wellbeing

PSC News, fall 2015 now available

Barbara Anderson appointed chair of Census Scientific Advisory Committee

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Monday, Feb 1 at noon, 6050 ISR-Thompson
Sarah Miller

Does more health care improve health among older adults? - A longitudinal analysis

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Golberstein, E., Jersey Liang, and A. Quinones. 2007. "Does more health care improve health among older adults? - A longitudinal analysis." Journal of Aging and Health, 19(6): 888-906.

Objectives: This research assesses the association of health services use with subsequent physical health among older Americans, adjusting for the confounding between health care use and prior health. Method: Longitudinal data are from the Survey on Assets and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD). Linear and logistic regressions are used to model the linkages between medical care use and health outcomes, including self-rated health, functional limitations, and mortality. Results: There is limited evidence that increased health care use is correlated with improved subsequent health. Increased use of medical care is largely associated with poorer health outcomes. Moreover, there are no significant interaction effects of health care use and baseline health on Activities of Daily Living and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, despite the existence of a significant but very small interaction effect on self-rated health. Conclusions: The findings have implications for the quality of care delivered by the American health care system.

DOI:10.1177/0898264307308338 (Full Text)

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