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Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

The relationship of older adults' activities and body mass index

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Jenkins, Kristi R., and Nancy Fultz. 2008. "The relationship of older adults' activities and body mass index." Journal of Aging and Health, 20(2): 217-234.

Objectives: To investigate the relationship between Body Mass Index (BMI) and older adults' hours of participation in 31 activities. Methods: Descriptive statistics are presented for the relationships between BMI and sociodemographics, health behaviors, and health characteristics. Linear regression was used to model the number of hours of participation in each activity. Results: The hypothesis that being overweight or obese is associated with older adults' activities was supported. For example, compared to those of normal weight, obese older adults spend fewer hours walking, exercising, praying and meditating, house cleaning, and engaging in personal grooming. And, compared to normal weight older adults, obese older adults spend a greater number of hours watching television. Discussion: These results substantiate prior findings of a negative relationship between physical activity and excess weight, and the lack of a relationship between social activity and BMI.

DOI:10.1177/0898264307310466 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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