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Maggie Levenstein named director of ISR's Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

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AAUP reports on faculty compensation by category, affiliation, and academic rank

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Neal Krause photo

Parental religious socialization practices and self-esteem in late life

Publication Abstract

Krause, Neal, and C.G. Ellison. 2007. "Parental religious socialization practices and self-esteem in late life." Review of Religious Research, 49(2): 109-127.

The purpose of this study is to assess the relationship between parental religious socialization practices and self-esteem in late life. The core theoretical thrust that was developed for this study is captured in the following linkages: (1) older Afirican Americans will be more likely than older Whites to report that their parents encouraged them to become involved in religion when they were growing up; (2) people whose parents encouraged them to become involved in religion will be more likely to attend church and pray privately in late life; (3) older adults who attend church often and pray frequently will be more committed to their faith; (4) older people who are more deeply committed to theirfaith will have a stronger sense of self-worth. Data from a nationwide survey of older adults provides support for all the relationships embedded in the study model.

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