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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Baseline patient characteristics and mortality associated with longitudinal intervention compliance

Publication Abstract

Lin, J.Y., T.R. Ten Have, H.R. Bogner, and Michael R. Elliott. 2007. "Baseline patient characteristics and mortality associated with longitudinal intervention compliance." Statistics in Medicine, 26(28): 5100-5115.

Lin et al. (http://www.biostatsresearch.com/upennbiostat/papers/, 2006) proposed a nested Markov compliance class model in the Imbens and Rubin compliance class model framework to account for time-varying subject noncompliance in longitudinal randomized intervention studies. We use superclasses, or latent compliance class principal strata, to describe longitudinal compliance patterns, and time-varying compliance classes are assumed to depend on the history of compliance. In this paper, we search for good subject-level baseline predictors of these superclasses and also examine the relationship between these superclasses and all-cause mortality. Since the superclasses are completely latent in all subjects, we utilize multiple imputation techniques to draw inferences. We apply this approach to a randomized intervention study for elderly primary care patients with depression.

DOI:10.1002/sim.2909 (Full Text)

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