Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Shaefer and Edin's book ($2 a Day) cited in piece on political debate over plight of impoverished Americans

Eisenberg tracks factors affecting both mental health and athletic/academic performance among college athletes

Shapiro says Americans' low spending reflects "cruel lesson" about the dangers of debt

Highlights

Susan Murphy elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Maggie Levenstein named director of ISR's Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

Arline Geronimus receives 2016 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award

PSC spring 2016 newsletter: Kristin Seefeldt, Brady West, newly funded projects, ISR Runs for Bob, and more

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

Risk factors for mortality among patients with diabetes - The Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD) Study

Publication Abstract

McEwen, L.N., Cheong-Seok Kim, A.J. Karter, Mary Haan, D. Ghosh, Paula M. Lantz, C.M. Mangione, T.J. Thompson, and W.H. Herman. 2007. "Risk factors for mortality among patients with diabetes - The Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD) Study." Diabetes Care, 30(7): 1736-1741.

OBJECTIVE - We sought to examine demographic, socioeconomic, and biological predictors of all-cause, cardiovascular, and noncardiovascular mortality in patients with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Survey, medical record, and administrative data were obtained from 8,733 participants in the Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes Study, a multicenter, prospective, observational study of diabetes care in managed care. Data on deaths (n = 79 1) and cause of death were obtained from the National Death Index after 4 years. Predictors examined included age, sex, race, education, income, duration, and treatment of diabetes, BMI, smoking, microvascular and macrovascular complications, and comorbidities. RESULTS - Predictors of adjusted all-cause mortality included older age (hazard ratio [HR]1.04 [95% CI 1.03-1.051), male sex (1.57 [1.35-1.83]), lower income (<$15,000 vs. >$75,000, HR 1.82 [1.30-2.541, $15,000-$40,000 vs.>$75,000, HR 1.58 [1.15-2.171), longer duration of diabetes ( >= 9 years vs. < 9 years, HR 1.20 [1.02-1.41]), lower BMI (< 26 vs. 26-30 k g/m(2), HR 1.43 [1.13-1.691), smoking (1.44 [1.20-1.74]), nephropathy (1.46 [1.232.73]), macrovascular disease (1.46 [1.23-1.741), and greater Charlson index ( >= 2-3 vs. < 1, HR 2.01 [1.04-3.90]; >= 3vs. < 1, HR 4.38 [2.26-8.47]). The predictors of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality were different. Macrovascular disease predicted cardiovascular but not noncardiovascular mortality. CONCLUSIONS - Among people with diabetes and access to medical care, older age, male sex, smoking, and renal disease are important predictors of mortality. Even within an insured population, socioeconomic circumstance is an important independent predictor of health.

DOI:10.2337/dc07-0305 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next