Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Lam says tightening global labor market good for American workers

Johnston says e-cigs may reverse two-decades of progress on smoking reduction

Mueller-Smith finds incarceration increases the likelihood of committing more, and more serious, crimes

Highlights

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

David Lam is new director of Institute for Social Research

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Elizabeth Bruch wins ASA award for paper in mathematical sociology

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags will be back fall 2015


Determinants of job search strategies: Evidence from the Khayelitsha/Mitchell's Plain Survey

Publication Abstract

Schoer, V., and Murray Leibbrandt. 2006. "Determinants of job search strategies: Evidence from the Khayelitsha/Mitchell's Plain Survey." South African Journal of Economics, 74(4): 702-724.

The search behaviour of the unemployed is an under-explored but important aspect of the unemployment puzzle in South Africa. The conventional conceptualisation of search rests on a simple dichotomy between active searching versus non-searching. This is a particularly blunt lens for investigating and understanding searchers who use social networks as the basis for their search strategy as such search does not qualify as active searching. Using data from metropolitan Cape Town this paper shows that such a search strategy is an important component of overall job-seeking behaviour for large percentages of searchers. A simple search model is presented to clarify the benefits and costs associated with different strategies and descriptive and multivariate analyses of the data are undertaken in order to highlight key factors influencing the choice of strategies. Findings illustrate the usefulness of the simple model by showing that the chosen search strategy is a compromise between the most effective way of finding a job and what is actually feasible for an individual. Being a female lowers the probability of active search compared to network search. A number of household characteristics are also important. Domestic duties hinder more active search while local embeddeness is key to the effectiveness of and the use of social network search.

DOI:10.1111/j.1813-6982.2006.00099.x (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next