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Short sleep duration across income, education, and Race/Ethnic groups: Population prevalence and growing disparities during 34 years of follow-up

Publication Abstract

Stamatakis, K.A., George A. Kaplan, and R.E. Roberts. 2007. "Short sleep duration across income, education, and Race/Ethnic groups: Population prevalence and growing disparities during 34 years of follow-up." Annals of Epidemiology, 17(12): 948-955.

Little is known about population determinants of short sleep duration. The authors examined associations between short sleep duration and income, education and race/ethnicity, and assessed changes over time in relative disparities. For this study, questionnaire data from the Alameda County Health and Ways of Living Study (ACS) was obtained at five time-points (1965, 1974, 1983, 1994, and 1999) for short sleep duration (<7 hours sleep per night). Household income, education level, and race/ethnicity were assessed at baseline (n = 6928). Odds ratios were computed to examine short sleep duration across income, education and race/ethnicity, adjusting for age, sex and time-varying covariates, and to assess changes over time. Researchers found the prevalence of short sleep at baseline was 15.2%. The (age-adjusted) odds of short sleep was increased for the lowest household income quintile (odds ratio [OR], 1.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34–1.94), those with less than high school education (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.30–1.75), and among African Americans (OR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.68–2.30). Relative disparities increased over time for African-American and Hispanic, compared with white, participants.

Conclusions: Socioeconomic position is a robust determinant of short sleep duration, even after adjusting for health-related characteristics linked to short sleep duration.

DOI:10.1016/j.annepidem.2007.07.096 (Full Text)

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