Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Thompson says America must "unchoose" policies that have led to mass incarceration

Axinn says new data on campus rape will "allow students to see for themselves the full extent of this problem"

Frey says white population is growing in Detroit and other large cities


Susan Murphy to speak at U-M kickoff for data science initiative, Oct 6, Rackham

Andrew Goodman-Bacon, former trainee, wins 2015 Nevins Prize for best dissertation in economic history

Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12 at noon, 6050 ISR
Joe Grengs: Policy & planning for transportation equity

Preserving natural features: A GIS-based evaluation of a local open-space ordinance

Publication Abstract

Taylor, J.J., Daniel Brown, and L. Larsen. 2007. "Preserving natural features: A GIS-based evaluation of a local open-space ordinance." Landscape and Urban Planning, 82(1-2): 1-16.

To study the influences of a local land-use policy on the preservation of natural features, two sets of ten local-scale landscapes, divided in time by a land-use policy shift in Fenton Township, Michigan, were examined. The new policy implemented a ‘sliding scale’ for open-space in all new developments within designated zoning classifications. Land-cover data were created to represent pre- and post-development conditions for twenty sites, ten developed before the policy was implemented, and ten after. The magnitudes of the mean change in landscape characteristics from pre- to post-development were compared for the before- and after-policy groups.

According to this analysis, the policy's objectives of preserving natural features and rural character were not fully achieved. This failure may be explained by a lack, within the policy, of several key points: a definition of natural features; a requirement that they shall be preserved; and a spatial context for design decisions. The only significant effect of the policy was that which was clearly defined by it—to increase open or non-developed space. Empirical observations and recommendations were presented to planning officials at Fenton Township. The open-space policy was subsequently updated, based on the findings of the presented research, in an attempt to achieve the broader policy objectives.

DOI:10.1016/j.landurbplan.2007.01.013 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next