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Surprising findings on what influences unintended pregnancy from Wise, Geronimus and Smock

Recommendations on how to reduce discrimination resulting from ban-the-box policies cite Starr's work

Brian Jacob on NAEP scores: "Michigan is the only state in the country where proficiency rates have actually declined over time."

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Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

Sioban Harlow honored with 2017 Sarah Goddard Power Award for commitment to women's health

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

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Mon, March 13, 2017, noon:
Rachel Best

An epidemiologic approach to the development of early trauma focused intervention

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Zatzick, D.F., and Sandro Galea. 2007. "An epidemiologic approach to the development of early trauma focused intervention." Journal of Traumatic Stress, 20(4): 401-412.

Early, trauma-focused intervention development has emphasized unidirectional trajectories that begin with basic research and efficacy trials followed later by effectiveness and dissemination studies. In this article, the authors present methods derived from social and clinical epidemiology that constitute foundational research in the development of early trauma-focused intervention. They also describe how population-based practice research may serve to feed back and inform what has been conceptualized as earlier stages of intervention development such as efficacy trials. Examples of relevant epidemiologic research methods are presented to illustrate these points. The authors posit that the continued application of population-based methods may produce treatments that can be feasibly applied to the unique patient, provider, organizational, and community contexts relevant to early interventions for survivors of trauma.

DOI:10.1002/jts.20256 (Full Text)

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