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Monday, April 21
Grant Miller: Managerial Incentives in Public Service Delivery

Redevelopment and the Rustbelt: Race, Class and the Consideration of Redeveloped Neighborhoods

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Download PDF versionBader, Michael. 2008. "Redevelopment and the Rustbelt: Race, Class and the Consideration of Redeveloped Neighborhoods." PSC Research Report No. 08-651. July 2008.

This study investigates who would consider moving to a redeveloped neighborhood based on a sample of residents living in Chicago and its surrounding suburbs. Results show different patterns depending on whether one is a homeowner or renter. Chicago owners are more likely to consider moving to a redeveloped neighborhood than suburban owners, particularly for whites and Latinos. Among renters, racial differences are more pronounced than city/suburban residence: black renters the most likely to consider a redeveloped neighborhood. Additionally, supporting theories of gentrification, I find some evidence that educational attainment predicts a willingness to consider a redeveloped neighborhood, but only among older respondents. While some argue that redevelopment could reduce the economic and racial segregation of rustbelt cities, I find this unlikely based on these results.

Country of focus: United States.

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