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Religious coping among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks and non-Hispanic Whites

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Chatters, L.M., R.J. Taylor, James S. Jackson, and K.D. Lincoln. 2008. "Religious coping among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks and non-Hispanic Whites." Journal of Community Psychology, 36(3): 371-386.

This study examined demographic predictors of attitudes regarding religious coping (i.e., prayer during stressful times and look to God for support, strength and guidance) within a national sample of African Americans, Caribbean Blacks, and non-Hispanic Whites (National Survey of American Life). The findings demonstrate significant Black-White differences in attitudes regarding religious coping with higher endorsements of religious coping among African Americans and Black Caribbeans (Caribbean Blacks). Comparisons of African Americans and Black Caribbeans revealed both similar and divergent Patterns of demographic effects. For both African Americans and Black Caribbeans, women were more likely to utilize religious coping than men and married respondents were more likely than never married respondents to report utilizing prayer when dealing with a stressful situation. Further, for both groups, higher levels of education were associated with lower endorsements of the importance of prayer in dealing with stressful situations. Among African Americans only, Southerners were more likely than respondents who resided in other regions to endorse religious coping. Among Black Caribbeans, those who emigrated from Haiti were more likely than Jamaicans to utilize religious coping when dealing with a stressful episode. (C) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

DOI:10.1002/jcop.20202 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC2967036. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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