Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Shaefer and Edin's book ($2 a Day) cited in piece on political debate over plight of impoverished Americans

Eisenberg tracks factors affecting both mental health and athletic/academic performance among college athletes

Shapiro says Americans' low spending reflects "cruel lesson" about the dangers of debt

Highlights

Susan Murphy elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Maggie Levenstein named director of ISR's Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

Arline Geronimus receives 2016 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award

PSC spring 2016 newsletter: Kristin Seefeldt, Brady West, newly funded projects, ISR Runs for Bob, and more

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

Improving attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder treatment outcomes through use of a collaborative consultation treatment service by community-based pediatricians - A cluster randomized trial

Publication Abstract

Epstein, J.N., D. Rabiner, D.E. Johnson, D.P. FitzGerald, A. Chrisman, A. Erkanli, K.K. Sullivan, J.S. March, P. Margolis, Edward Norton, and K. Conners. 2007. "Improving attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder treatment outcomes through use of a collaborative consultation treatment service by community-based pediatricians - A cluster randomized trial." Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 161(9): 835-840.

Objective: To test whether adoption of a collaborative consultative service model results in improved patient outcomes. Design: Twelve pediatric practices were randomly assigned to receive access to collaborative consultative services or to a control group. Setting: Community-based pediatric offices. Participants: Fifty-two pediatricians and their 377 patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder ( ADHD). Intervention: A collaborative consultative service promoting the use of titration trials and periodic monitoring during medication maintenance. Main Outcome Measure: Physician practice behaviors and child ADHD symptomatology. Results: Using self-report of pediatricians, the collaborative consultative service increased the use of evidencebased practices by pediatricians, but no difference in children's ADHD symptomatology was observed between the groups. However, many pediatricians did not fully use the collaborative consultative services. Those children who actually received collaborative consultative services showed significant behavioral improvement compared with children not receiving these services. Conclusions: When actually implemented by pediatricians, the collaborative consultative service appears to be an effective method for facilitating evidence-based treatment procedures for ADHD and use of these procedures appear to improve children's outcomes. Barriers to implementation of collaborative consultative service in pediatric practice need to be further understood.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next