Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Frey's Scenario F simulation mentioned in account of the Democratic Party's tribulations

U-M Poverty Solutions funds nine projects

Dynarski says NY's Excelsior Scholarship Program could crowd out low-income and minority students

More News

Highlights

Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Effect of drive-through delivery laws on postpartum length of stay and hospital charges

Publication Abstract

Liu, Z.M., W.H. Dow, and Edward Norton. 2004. "Effect of drive-through delivery laws on postpartum length of stay and hospital charges." Journal of Health Economics, 23(1): 129-155.

Postpartum hospital length of stay fell rapidly during the 1980s and 1990s, perhaps due to increased managed care penetration. In response, 32 states enacted early postpartum discharge laws between 1995 and 1997, and a federal law took effect in 1998. We analyze how these laws changed length of stay and hospital charges, using a national discharge database. Difference-in-differences models show that the laws increased both length of stay and hospital charges, but the magnitude of this effect is much smaller than has been estimated in previously reported case studies. Furthermore, we find that effects vary by law details, that ERISA diluted the law effects, and that law effects partially spilled over to unregulated Medicaid births. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next