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Processing fluency and aesthetic pleasure: Is beauty in the perceiver's processing experience?

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Reber, R., Norbert Schwarz, and P. Winkielman. 2004. "Processing fluency and aesthetic pleasure: Is beauty in the perceiver's processing experience?" Personality and Social Psychology Review, 8(4): 364-382.

We propose that aesthetic pleasure is a function of the perceiver's processing dynamics: The more fluently perceivers can process an object, the more positive their aesthetic response. We review variables known to influence aesthetic judgments, such as figural goodness, figure-ground contrast, stimulus repetition, symmetry, and prototypicality, and trace their effects to changes in processing fluency. Other variables that influence processing fluency, like visual or semantic priming, similarly increase judgments of aesthetic pleasure. Our proposal provides an integrative framework for the study of aesthetic pleasure and sheds light on the interplay between early preferences versus cultural influences on taste, preferences for both prototypical and abstracted forms, and the relation between beauty and truth. In contrast to theories that trace aesthetic pleasure to objective stimulus features per se, we propose that beauty is grounded in the processing experiences of the perceiver which are in part a function of stimulus properties.

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