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Determinants of HIV counselling and testing participation in a Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission programme in rural Burkina Faso

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Sarker, M., A. Sanou, Rachel C. Snow, J. Ganame, and A. Gondos. 2007. "Determinants of HIV counselling and testing participation in a Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission programme in rural Burkina Faso." Tropical Medicine & International Health, 12(12): 1475-1483.

OBJECTIVES To analyse the factors associated with the uptake of HIV counselling, HIV testing and returning for test results in a rural hospital setting in Nouna, Burkina Faso. METHODS Cross sectional survey of 435 pregnant women who visited the district hospital for antenatal care, from July to December 2004. Separate multivariate logistic regression analyses including analysis of reported reasons were performed to identify the factors associated with accepting HIV counselling and testing. RESULTS HIV testing participation was related to discussing HIV screening with the partner (OR 8.36), and the number of antenatal care (ANC) visits already accomplished (OR 2.23). The quality of pre-test counselling was very poor as 42% did not understand the process. The absence of doctors and mismanagement of time for post-test counselling were the main reasons why women did not receive test results. Analysis of participants by discussion status, counselling and test participation revealed that fewer women dropped out at every stage who discussed HIV testing with their partner. CONCLUSION Communication with the partner plays a vital role in the uptake of HIV testing. Encouraging women to engage in a discussion about testing with their partners may be a viable intervention to improve participation. Quality of service needs to be better.

DOI:10.1111/j.1365-3156.2007.01956.x (Full Text)

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