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COSSA makes 10 suggestions to next Administration for supporting and using social science research

Thompson says US prison population is 'staggeringly high' at about 1.5 million, despite 2% drop for 2015

Levy et al. find Michigan's Medicaid expansion boosted state's economy while increasing number of insured

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2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

Russell Sage 2-week workshop on social science genomics, June 11-23, 2017, Santa Barbara

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

A quantitative and qualitative approach to social relationships and well-being in the United States and Japan

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Lansford, J.E., Toni Antonucci, H. Akiyama, and K. Takahashi. 2005. "A quantitative and qualitative approach to social relationships and well-being in the United States and Japan." Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 36(1): 1-22.

It is well established that social relationships influence individuals' psychological wellbeing by providing love, intimacy, reassurance of worth, tangible assistance, and guidance (e.g., Rowe Kahn, 1998; Sarason et al., 1990). Across the life span.. lacking high quality relationships is associated with negative physical and psychological consequences such as anxiety, depression, loneliness, and poor health (Cohen Syme. 1985; Duck. 1983; Rowe & Kahn, 1998). Despite this evidence that social relationships are importantly related to wellbeing, comparative, cross-cultural work is rare; most of the research in this field has been conducted on White, middle-class Americans, making it ill-advised to generalize findings beyond this population (see Adams, 1989; Adams & Blieszner. 1994). What individuals think, value, and do in relationships is influenced by the cultural contexts in which the-se relationships are embedded. The present study compares associations between social relationships and well-being in the United States and Japan.

Countries of focus: Japan, United States of America.

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