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2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

Russell Sage 2-week workshop on social science genomics, June 11-23, 2017, Santa Barbara

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Spatial Dynamics of the Local Built Environment in the City of Chicago: An Investigation of Data Sources and Methods

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Download PDF versionBader, Michael, and Jennifer Ailshire. 2008. "Spatial Dynamics of the Local Built Environment in the City of Chicago: An Investigation of Data Sources and Methods." PSC Research Report No. 08-663. 12 2008.

Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of the local built environment on individual health outcomes. Further investigation of key theoretical issues, namely improved conceptualization of potential causal mechanisms and the definition of neighborhood boundaries, is hindered by issues of measurement. Using innovative data collected from systematic social observations of a sample (N=1,663) blocks in the city of Chicago, we adapt the geostatistical method of kriging used in environmental and material sciences to demonstrate how the spatial autocorrelation of observations in the social environment can be used to create both nuanced and geographically comprehensive measures the built environment. We validate kriging as a method of estimating the physical condition of buildings on city blocks and use measured based on this estimation to investigate the association between the physical conditions of buildings on self-rated health. We discuss the implications for data collection and analysis of neighborhood effects on health and suggest possible extensions using other innovative methods of measurement.

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