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Project VIVA: A multilevel community-based intervention to increase influenza vaccination rates among hard-to-reach populations in New York City

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Coady, M.H., Sandro Galea, S. Blaney, D.C. Ompad, S. Sisco, D. Vlahov, and W. Project Viva Intervention. 2008. "Project VIVA: A multilevel community-based intervention to increase influenza vaccination rates among hard-to-reach populations in New York City." American Journal of Public Health, 98(7): 1314-1321.

Objectives. We sought to determine whether the work of a community-based participatory research partnership increased interest in influenza vaccination among hard-to-reach individuals in urban settings. Methods. A partnership of researchers and community members carried out interventions for increasing acceptance of influenza vaccination in disadvantaged urban neighborhoods, focusing on hard-to-reach populations (e.g., substance abusers, immigrants, elderly, sex workers, and homeless persons) in East Harlem and the Bronx in New York City. Activities targeted the individual, community organization, and neighborhood levels and included dissemination of information, presentations at meetings, and provision of street-based and door-to-door vaccination during 2 influenza vaccine seasons. Participants were recruited via multiple modalities. Multivariable analyses were performed to compare interest in receiving vaccination pre- and postintervention. Results. There was increased interest in receiving the influenza vaccine postintervention (P <.01). Being a member of a hard-to-reach population (P=.03), having ever received an influenza vaccine (P <.01), and being in a priority group for vaccination (P <.01) were also associated with greater interest in receiving the vaccine. Conclusions. Targeting underserved neighborhoods through a multilevel community-based participatory research intervention significantly increased interest in influenza vaccination, particularly among hard-to-reach populations. Such interventions hold promise for increasing vaccination rates annually and in pandemic situations.

DOI:10.2105/ajph.2007.119586 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC2424104. (Pub Med Central)

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