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Axinn says data show incidents of sexual assault start at 'very young age'

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Impacts of H-1B visas: Lower prices and higher production - or lower wages and higher profits?

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Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

Sioban Harlow honored with 2017 Sarah Goddard Power Award for commitment to women's health

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

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Mon, Feb 13, 2017, noon:
Daniel Almirall, "Getting SMART about adaptive interventions"

Congregational Support Networks, Health Beliefs, and Annual Medical Exams: Findings from a Nationwide Sample of Presbyterians

Publication Abstract

Ellison, C.G., J. Lee, M.R. Benjamins, Neal Krause, D.N. Ryan, and J.P. Marcum. 2008. "Congregational Support Networks, Health Beliefs, and Annual Medical Exams: Findings from a Nationwide Sample of Presbyterians." Review of Religious Research, 50(2): 176-193.

Explanations for associations between religious involvement and preventive health care utilization remain poorly understood. Using 2007 data from a nationwide sample of members of the Presbyterian Church U.S.A., we develop and test several hypotheses concerning religious beliefs, congregational practices, and informal church-based networks in shaping the likelihood of obtaining annual medical checkups. Members of churches with higher levels of formal health activities and those who discuss health matters within informal member networks are more likely to have checkups. At least part of this association reflects the role of doctor recommendations from church members. Surprisingly, beliefs in the sanctity of the body are inversely associated with the likelihood of obtaining checkups. Several dispositional factors (planfulness, conformity, social desirability) are considered and dismissed as explanations for the observed patterns.

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