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Axinn says data show incidents of sexual assault start at 'very young age'

Miech on 'generational forgetting' about drug-use dangers

Impacts of H-1B visas: Lower prices and higher production - or lower wages and higher profits?

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Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

Sioban Harlow honored with 2017 Sarah Goddard Power Award for commitment to women's health

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

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Mon, Feb 13, 2017, noon:
Daniel Almirall, "Getting SMART about adaptive interventions"

The psychological impact of impending forced settler disengagement in Gaza: trauma and posttraumatic growth

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Hall, B.J., S.E. Hobfoll, P.A. Palmieri, D. Canetti-Nisim, O. Shapira, Robert Alan Johnson, and Sandro Galea. 2008. "The psychological impact of impending forced settler disengagement in Gaza: trauma and posttraumatic growth." Journal of Traumatic Stress, 21(1): 22-29.

The Israeli governments decision to remove settlers in the Gaza Strip forcibly produced a situation of traumatic stress, resulting from confrontation and conflict for settlers. The authors examined the effects of the Gaza disengagement, that occurred following prolonged terrorist exposure, on rates of probable major depressive disorder (MDD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis in a representative sample of Gaza settlers (N= 190). Predictors of probable MDD in multivariate models were being female, and experiencing greater economic and psychosocial resource loss. Predictors of probable PTSD were being older and experiencing greater psychosocial resource loss. Posttraumatic growth was significantly related to a reduction in the odds of having probable PTSD. This latter finding is interpreted within our conceptualization of action-focused growth.

DOI:10.1002/jts.20301 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC2721270. (Pub Med Central)

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