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Filiz Garip, Changing Dynamics of Mexico-U.S. Migration

The North American Animal Disease Spread Model: A simulation model to assist decision making in evaluating animal disease incursions

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Harvey, N., A. Reeves, Michael Schoenbaum, F.J. Zagmutt-Vergara, C. Dub, A.E. Hill, B.A. Corso, W.B. McNab, C.I. Cartwright, and M.D. Salman. 2007. "The North American Animal Disease Spread Model: A simulation model to assist decision making in evaluating animal disease incursions." Preventive Veterinary Medicine, 82:176-197.

The North American Animal Disease Spread Model is a stochastic, spatial, state-transition simulation model for the spread of highly contagious diseases of animals. It was developed with broad international support to assist policy development and decision making involving disease incursions. User-established parameters define model behavior in terms of disease progression; disease spread by animal-to-animal contact, contact with contaminated personnel or equipment, and airborne dissemination; and the implementation of control measures such as destruction and vaccination. Resources available to implement disease control strategies, as well as the direct costs associated with these strategies, are taken into consideration. The model records a wide variety of measures of the extent of simulated outbreaks and other characteristics. The graphical interface and output visualization features also make it a useful tool for training and preparedness exercises. This model is now being used to evaluate outbreak scenarios and potential control strategies for several economically important exotic animal diseases in the United States, Canada, and elsewhere. NAADSM is freely available via the Internet at http://www.naadsm.org. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOI:10.1016/j.prevetmed.2007.05.019 (Full Text)

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