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Axinn says data show incidents of sexual assault start at 'very young age'

Miech on 'generational forgetting' about drug-use dangers

Impacts of H-1B visas: Lower prices and higher production - or lower wages and higher profits?

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Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

Sioban Harlow honored with 2017 Sarah Goddard Power Award for commitment to women's health

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

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Mon, Feb 13, 2017, noon:
Daniel Almirall, "Getting SMART about adaptive interventions"

Does caring for your spouse harm one's health? Evidence from a United States nationally-representative sample of older adults

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Jenkins, Kristi R., M.U. Kabeto, and Kenneth M. Langa. 2009. "Does caring for your spouse harm one's health? Evidence from a United States nationally-representative sample of older adults." Ageing and Society, 29: 277-293.

The purpose of this article is to investigate the relationship between spousal care-giving and declines in functioning and self-rated health among older care-givers. The authors used data from the 2000 and 2002 waves or the United States Health and Retirement Study, a biennial longitudinal survey of a nationally representative cohort of adults aged 50 or more years. Two outcomes were examined, declines in functioning and declines in self-rated health, Care-givers were classified into three groups: no care-giving less than 14 hours of care-giving per week, and 14 or more hours care-giving per week. To assess declines in functioning, two Summary scores were created or limitations in basic and instrumental Activities of Daily Living. To assess declines in self-rated health, we compared responses from 2000 and 2002. In the fully adjusted models, care-giving hours did riot have an independent effect. on declines in functioning or self-rated health. The relationship between care-giving hours and declines in functioning and self-rated health is probably attributable to socio-demographic characteristics, mainly age. The findings suggest that spousal care-giving does not of itself harm functional health or perceived health among older adult care-givers. Understanding the differential effects or these socio-economic characteristics with care-giving hours on health will be useful in promoting the health of older adult care-givers and treating their disorders.

DOI:10.1017/s0144686x08007824 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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