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The Prevalence and Types of Gambling Among Undocumented Mexican Immigrants in New York City

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Momper, S.L., V. Nandi, D.C. Ompad, J. Delva, and Sandro Galea. 2009. "The Prevalence and Types of Gambling Among Undocumented Mexican Immigrants in New York City." Journal of Gambling Studies, 25(1): 49-65.

Objectives To examine the prevalence of gambling and types of gambling activities in a sample of undocumented Mexican immigrants. Design Non-probability cross-sectional design. Setting New York City. Sample The 431 respondents ranged in age from 18 to 80 (mean age 32), 69.7% were male. Results More than half (53.8%) reported gambling in their lifetime and of those most (43.9%) played scratch and win tickets or the lottery. In multivariate analyses men reported gambling more than women [2.13, 95% CI = (1.03, 4.38)]. The odds of gambling in their lifetime were higher among those reporting sending money to family or friends in the home country [2.65, 95% CI = 1.10, 6.38)], and those who reported 1-5 days as compared to no days of poor mental health in the past 30 days [2.44, 95% CI = 1.22, 4.89)]. Conversely, those who reported entering the U.S. to live after 1996 were less likely to report gambling [0.44, 95% CI = (0.22, 0.89)] as compared to those who had lived in the U.S. longer. Conclusion There is a need to further explore both the prevalence and the severity of gambling amongst the growing population of undocumented Mexican immigrants in the U.S.

DOI:10.1007/s10899-008-9105-9 (Full Text)

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Countries of focus: Mexico, United States of America.

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