Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Shaefer and Edin's book ($2 a Day) cited in piece on political debate over plight of impoverished Americans

Eisenberg tracks factors affecting both mental health and athletic/academic performance among college athletes

Shapiro says Americans' low spending reflects "cruel lesson" about the dangers of debt

Highlights

Susan Murphy elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Maggie Levenstein named director of ISR's Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

Arline Geronimus receives 2016 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award

PSC spring 2016 newsletter: Kristin Seefeldt, Brady West, newly funded projects, ISR Runs for Bob, and more

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

The Family Contexts of Marriage Timing in Nepal

Publication Abstract

Dahal, Dilli R., Tom E. Fricke, and Arland Thornton. 1993. "The Family Contexts of Marriage Timing in Nepal." Ethnology, 32(4): 305-23.

This study draws upon two traditions of analysis to explore the differential timing of marriage among the women of Timling, a central Himalayan village in Nepal inhabited by the Tamang and Ghale descendants of migrants from Tibet. They explore the family politics of marriage timing in one setting of the Tamang Family Research Project, a microdemographic study of changing life course experience, family relationships, and fertility behavior in two Nepali communities. The project involved ethnographic and survey data collection in 1987-88 and 1991, building on earlier fieldwork in Timling in 1981. While their analysis begins with the anthropological insight that in societies organized by kinship, marriage processes are instrumental to structuring social reproduction, methodologically the authors utilizes quantitative tools of event history analysis commonly used by demographers but rarely by anthropologists. The results confirm the usefulness of applying models of social action concerned with the differential interest of actors to even such prosaic oncerns as the timing of women's marriage.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next