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Frey's Scenario F simulation mentioned in account of the Democratic Party's tribulations

U-M Poverty Solutions funds nine projects

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Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Examining Racial/Ethnic Minority Treatment Experiences with Specialty Behavioral Health Service Providers

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Redmond, M.L., Sandro Galea, and J. Delva. 2009. "Examining Racial/Ethnic Minority Treatment Experiences with Specialty Behavioral Health Service Providers." Community Mental Health Journal, 45(2): 85-96.

This study investigated whether satisfaction and helpfulness of treatment by mental health service provider is related to race/ethnicity and psychosocial factors. Data from the National Co morbidity Survey-Replication study, which administered mental health service use questions for the past 12-months (1332), was analyzed. Data were stratified by service provider and analyzed with multiple logistic regressions. Racial/ethnic minorities were generally more likely to be satisfied with services provided by specialty mental health providers compared to white respondents. Racial/ethnic minorities generally perceived the services provided by specialty mental health providers as more helpful than did other racial/ethnic groups. Those who reported high cultural identity were more likely to find their treatment experience less satisfying and less helpful. Greater attention to specialty referrals for racial/ethnic minority groups may fruitfully contribute to improve help-seeking for these groups. The role culture plays in shaping the mental health treatment experience needs to be further investigated.

DOI:10.1007/s10597-008-9164-5 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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