Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

H. Luke Shaefer and colleagues argue for a universal child allowance

Hindustan Times points out high value of H-1B visas for US innovation, welfare, and tech firm profits

Novak, Geronimus, Martinez-Cardoso: Threat of deportation harmful to immigrants' health

More News

Highlights

Heather Ann Thompson wins Pulitzer Prize for book on Attica uprising

Lam explores dimensions of the projected 4 billion increase in world population before 2100

ISR's Nick Prieur wins UMOR award for exceptional contribution to U-M's research mission

How effectively can these nations handle outside investments in health R&D?

More Highlights

Follicle stimulating hormone and its rate of change in defining menopause transition stages

Publication Abstract

Sowers, M.R., H. Zheng, D. McConnell, B. Nan, Sioban D. Harlow, and J.F. Randolph. 2008. "Follicle stimulating hormone and its rate of change in defining menopause transition stages." Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 93(10): 3958-3964.

Context/Objective: The objective of the study was to identify menopause transition stages using acceleration or deceleration patterns of FSH rates of change from the late reproductive years to postmenopause. Setting/Participants: Participants were the Michigan Bone Health and Metabolism Study cohort of 629 women, aged 24-44 yr (in 1992/3), with 5757 annual FSH data points over a 14-yr period. Design/Main Outcome Measures: The study was designed to relate acceleration/deceleration patterns in FSH rate of change to time to final menstrual period (FMP) and chronological age using nonparametric and piecewise regression modeling. Results: Four major FSH stages, based on rate of FSH change patterns, were identifiable in relation to the FMP. In FSH stage 1, the rate of FSH change increased modestly up to -7 yr prior to the FMP; in FSH stage 2 (-7 to -2 yr prior to FMP), there was a major acceleration in FSH rate of change. FSH stage 3 had an acute increase in FSH rate of change (-2 to +1 yr around the FMP), with average FSH level of 34 mIU/ml. The fourth, or plateau, FSH stage began at 1 yr after FMP when the average FSH level was 54 mIU/ml. During the yr 28-60, there were eight age-specific epochs defined by significant changes of FSH trajectory accelerations or decelerations and rate of change. Conclusions: Four menopause transition stages bounding the FMP and eight epochs in chronological aging from age 28 to 60 yr were defined by changes of FSH trajectory accelerations/decelerations and rates of change. This timing information, combined with knowledge of FSH levels and menstrual cycle characteristics, can help discern the likely status of women with respect to their reproductive viability and menopause transition stage.

DOI:10.1210/jc.2008-0482 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC2579655. (Pub Med Central)

Licensed Access Link

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next