Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Shaefer and Edin's book ($2 a Day) cited in piece on political debate over plight of impoverished Americans

Eisenberg tracks factors affecting both mental health and athletic/academic performance among college athletes

Shapiro says Americans' low spending reflects "cruel lesson" about the dangers of debt

Highlights

Susan Murphy elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Maggie Levenstein named director of ISR's Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

Arline Geronimus receives 2016 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award

PSC spring 2016 newsletter: Kristin Seefeldt, Brady West, newly funded projects, ISR Runs for Bob, and more

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

We knew them when: Sixth grade characteristics that predict adolescent high school social identities

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Stone, M.R., B.L. Barber, and Jacquelynne S. Eccles. 2008. "We knew them when: Sixth grade characteristics that predict adolescent high school social identities." Journal of Early Adolescence, 28(2): 304-328.

Discriminant function analysis assessed the predictive relevance of nine characteristics measured in sixth grade for differentiating among social identities claimed 4 years later by 616 participants in the Michigan Study of Life Transitions. For females, the first discriminant function, associated with academic motivation, self-esteem, and appearance, accounted for 47% of between-group variability, and the second ( sports competence and social skills) accounted for 36%. For males, the first discriminant function ( academic ability and self-concept of appearance, in opposite directions) accounted for 54% of variability, and the second ( sports competence) accounted for 30%. Findings suggest that differences among individuals with particular high school social identities predate adolescence and point to differences in the primary predictors of male and female identity categories.

DOI:10.1177/0272431607312743 (Full Text)

Licensed Access Link

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next