Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Shaefer and Edin's book ($2 a Day) cited in piece on political debate over plight of impoverished Americans

Eisenberg tracks factors affecting both mental health and athletic/academic performance among college athletes

Shapiro says Americans' low spending reflects "cruel lesson" about the dangers of debt

Highlights

Susan Murphy elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Maggie Levenstein named director of ISR's Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

Arline Geronimus receives 2016 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award

PSC spring 2016 newsletter: Kristin Seefeldt, Brady West, newly funded projects, ISR Runs for Bob, and more

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

Weight Adjustments for the Grouped Jackknife Variance Estimator

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Valliant, Richard L., J. Michael Brick, and Jill A. Dever. 2008. "Weight Adjustments for the Grouped Jackknife Variance Estimator." Journal of Official Statistics, 24(3): 469-488.

The jackknife variance estimator is often implemented by dropping groups of units rather than a single unit at a time. This has the practical advantages of economizing on computation time and file size because a separate weight is appended to the analysis file for each jackknife replicate. If the replicate weight adjustments and the grouped jackknife itself are not appropriately constructed, the variance estimates can have some extremely pathological behavior when estimating totals. When the dropout groups do not all have exactly the same number of first-stage units, the standard version of the grouped jackknife may be a severe overestimate. This problem is most likely to arise in single-stage samples with a large number of first-stage units in many of the strata. The standard grouped jackknife variance estimator and two alternatives are examined for the situation of unequally sized groups through a simulation study of school districts in the 50 United States and the District of Columbia.

Public Access Link

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next