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Sastry's 10-year study of New Orleans Katrina evacuees shows demographic differences between returning and nonreturning

Stafford says less educated, smaller investors more likely to sell off stock and lock in losses during market downturn

Chen says job fit, job happiness can be achieved over time

Highlights

Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

David Lam is new director of Institute for Social Research

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12
Joe Grengs, Policy & Planning for Social Equity in Transportation

Cell collapsing in poststratification

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Kim, Jay J., Jianzhu Li, and Richard L. Valliant. 2007. "Cell collapsing in poststratification." Survey Methodology, 33(2): 139-150.

Poststratification is a common method of estimation in household surveys. Cells are formed based on characteristics that are known for all sample respondents and for which external control counts are available from a census or another source. The inverses of the poststratification adjustments are usually referred to as coverage ratios. Coverage of some demographic groups may be substantially below 100 percent, and poststratifying serves to correct for biases due to poor coverage. A standard procedure in poststratification is to collapse or combine cells when the sample sizes fall below some minimum or the weight adjustments are above some maximum. Collapsing can either increase or decrease the variance of an estimate but may simultaneously increase its bias. We study the effects on bias and variance of this type of dynamic cell collapsing theoretically and through simulation using a population based on the 2003 National Health Interview Survey. Two alternative estimators are also proposed that restrict the size of weight adjustments when cells are collapsed.

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